The top 5 emails of summer (+ 5 seasonal Email Marketing tips)

15 July 2021Reading time: 4 min.

We’re in the middle of summer. Have your campaigns made the change of season? Get inspired by the summer’s top emails and discover some strategic tips to fully harness this opportunity.

As we know, summer always gives brands new opportunities to strike up the conversation and re-establish contact with the user. There’s always a right “excuse” to send summer-themed campaigns that fit specific markets and respond to easily predictable needs. So some sectors will promote tourist destinations, travel, and essential products for upcoming vacations. Someone else will advertise season events and activities. Others, more generally, will take advantage of the summer sales.

In theory, it’s easy to create the perfect summer email. But in practice, the risk of conforming to dozens of email campaigns is very high. Therefore, how do you capture the user’s attention and stand out in the inbox?

Here are the top 5 summer-themed emails for you to get inspired in reviewing or integrating your summer email campaigns if you haven’t developed any Email Marketing strategy yet.

The top 5 emails of summer

Peel’s curiosity and mystery

peel summer email example

Get inspired by:

The strength of this campaign lies on the curiosity triggered by the brand’s mysterious offer. Perfectly themed visuals hide the subject line of the promotion. This is likely to push the user to click on the CTA button and discover more details. The color palette offers vibrant nuances that stand out against two neutral and contrasting backgrounds (beige and black). This also gives the email a summer touch while maintaining a clean and sober style. 

The Thumbtack drip campaign

Thumbtack connects customers online with different local professionals from home management to event organization. The company has leveraged on summer through a drip campaign that sounds like a tutorial for building the perfect summer project. In fact, it matches the promotion of the services available on the platform with the seasonal wave and the current needs of the public. In particular, 3 of the campaign emails show consistency in terms of design, structure, and content:

summer project drip campaign 1
summer project drip campaign 2
summer project drip campaign 2

Get inspired by:

For sure, this drip campaign’s strength is the ability to convey a seamless and consistent communication and schedule an enticing series of appointments. What an excellent tool to facilitate openings and engagement! Furthermore, the hybrid layout is strategic for promoting the brand’s various services and fits the perfect summer project to-do-list concept. 

J.Crew’s invitation to scroll

J.Crew summer email example

Get inspired by:

This email’s originality manages to capture the users’ attention and accompany them to the end of the message. Such a path undoubtedly facilitates the chance of clicks. It does it with a huge title. This follows one of the top email design trends for 2021, that is, exaggerated and bold copy and the excessive length and visual. So the recipient is encouraged to scroll through the entire email. However, a second CTA button is placed just under the main title to please even the laziest and avoid the risk of any missed scrolling. 

8fit’s colors and visuals

8fit's summer email example

Get inspired by: 

The choice of bright, pop colors like the bold yellow of this email, plus themed images or GIFs is a widely used best practice. It is still winning and effective when it comes to summer email campaigns. This means using all the typical symbols of summer: sun, sea waves, summer fruit, sunglasses, beach umbrellas, shells, and so on. These represent an easy yet impactful solution to breathe new life into your campaign.

The font pop touch by Leesa and Friendly

Friendly's summer email example
Leesa summer email example

Get inspired by:

Following in the same footsteps of the previous example, the choice of more informal, eccentric, and pop fonts helps emit, without too much effort, the feeling of relaxation, fun, and positivity that’s typical of summer. Don’t run into legibility problems (if you don’t know what it is, then check out more here) and don’t overdo it with an overly complex and eccentric design. Balance the use of particular fonts with clean, neat styles, as both campaigns do. 

5 tips to seize this summer’s potential

1. Make your proposal fit for summer

Ease the life of your contacts and earn their long-term trust and loyalty. Besides offering discounts and promotions on your products, unleash your creativity with ideas and suggestions. Fill up your DEMs and newsletters with summer months’ events, activities, and experiences, trip or project to-do lists, and summer survival kits that include a selection of your products or travel tips. In other words, make yourself useful. Advise on how to best face this season while remaining consistent with your target market. Look at Malin + Goetz, a beauty and personal care brand. They did it with a package of essential summer products. 

malin + goetz summer email example

2. Play with emojis

Everybody knows that summer is the time to loosen up after winter and use more fun and cheerful tones. What better than an emoji to jump start the right summer vibes? 

Capitalize on the evocative potential of these symbols to produce original, creative, and more informal subject lines. This way, you’ll avoid presenting the same, recurrent inbox elements to the user. Stand out from the crowd with the new emojis from the BEE editor

Get inspired by these topics: 

ASOS summer email subject line

Source: ASOS

Penguin summer subject line

Source: Penguin 

3. Create urgency 

Take advantage of the phenomenon known as the Fear of Missing Out, meaning the anxiety of being excluded from events, occasions, and experiences considered socially relevant. Creating a sense of urgency has always been an effective strategy. This greatly suits this beloved season and all its events and activities. 

Hence, feed this “fear.” Create hypes directly in the subject lines using words that excite the user with a feeling of “unmissable opportunity.” Transfer this feeling within the message via strategic copy and visuals, as Solo does with this expressive, perfectly summer-themed image of an almost melted icicle: 

Solo summer email example

4. Play with puns 

Don’t limit the summer opportunity to bright shades, themed visuals, and eccentric fonts: focus on the copy and use the numerous puns and pop-culture references that come with this season. Not by chance, it’s when summer hits explode. Take a cue from this Casper email, which makes a pun based on the double meaning of the term “blow”: inflate the mattress (the subject of the sales strategy) but also make the discounts of the summer sales pop. 

Casper summer email example

5. Use a real-time marketing strategy

Lighter restrictions and the gradual return to a new normal, together with the reigniting of tourism, have changed the forecasts of a locked summer season. Therefore, many companies have taken advantage of this scenario to relaunch their sales strategies. Such a scenario calls for real-time marketing. This means being reactive to a changing context and riding the wave of the news of the moment. What an excellent tactic to capture the user’s interest on hot and relevant topics! 

The cosmetics brand Tarte, for example, relies on this strategy for relaunching summer must-haves, regardless of failed projections:

Tarte real time marketing email example

Conclusions

These 5 tips and 5 summer-themed emails were meant to inspire and make it easier to create email campaigns in tune with summer. 

However, why not give even more impulse and efficacy to your Email Marketing strategies? Contact our team of experts and let us help you build the campaign tailored to your needs. Request a no-obligation consultation, and we’ll help breathe new life into your emails. 

This article was written by

Paola Bergamini

Paola Bergamini

I was born in 1993 in Como and I escaped from this little town to study in Milan, where I graduated in 2017 in philosophy. I've always been interested in marketing and communication and I love writing and reading. As Content Editor at MailUp, I try to keep up to date with Email and Digital Marketing news, in order to share trends, theories and tools about this constantly evolving sector.

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